Career Calling

November 2, 2015

The Problem of Going Down the Career Ladder

 

Today’s Chicago Sun-Times features an interesting article by Paul Davidson (USA Today) on the problem of moving back in a career, taking a lower level position, to stay employed. Davidson cites experts who say that a person who tries to take a few steps down on the career ladder is actually less likely to get hired. Applicants who were unemployed but seeking jobs at their current level were more likely to get hired.

That doesn’t surprise me. It’s not a matter of being employed or employed. It’s a matter of being qualified. Candidates who dumb down their resume or take a lower level job often show themselves as overqualified. They are less likely to get hired for lower level jobs because employers are worried that they would be bored or constantly looking for a job at their level. Worse still, as Davidson notes, if job seekers are “lucky” enough to land a lower level job, it’s very hard to climb back up the ladder. The article features the story of a former executive who took a job as a front line employee to keep from having a gap in her resume. Now she is having trouble getting interviews for executive positions.

My advice to clients is to take a lower level job only in two cases. First, if you need immediate income, take whatever job will give you the income you need. Second, if clients are looking to downshift and work at positions with less responsibility, they should pursue those jobs. In both cases, I inform them that moving back up the ladder will be difficult. Don’t move down the career ladder without considering the consequences.

 

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September 8, 2015

John Wooden on Playing Your Strengths

 

The great UCLA basketball coach John Wooden said, “Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.”

I agree with Wooden 100%. Many clients come to me almost paralyzed with areas of weakness and career obstacles. In almost every case, these people have been successful in their careers or just completed a new degree. My job, one I greatly enjoy, is helping them see what they have to offer. Most people have made great contributions to their employers. Their problem is telling the story. They think too much about what “they cannot do.” Instead, as Wooden recommended, the secret to know is what you do best. Play your strengths.

September 1, 2015

Keeping a Job Search Focused and Targeted

 

One of my clients called me to ask about her job search. Mary (not her real name) has not looked for work for more than 10 years. One source of her frustration was the time it took to fill out applications on line. Unfortunately, there are no short cuts if you wish to apply on line. I talked to Mary about budgeting her time and not trying to do too much in one day.

Mary was also doing something that hurt her chances of getting hired. I asked her to give me a sample of the jobs she was applying for. 70% were in line with the focus of her resume, which was administrative support. The problem was that 30% were for positions that Mary was not qualified for. She has done some work in meeting planning and editing, but neither of those functions has been her primary duty. When she applies for jobs in those areas, she wasting her time and increasing the frustration that is part of every job search.

We talked about how to keep her job search focused on the kinds of job for which she is most qualified. It’s hard enough to find a job. It gets much more difficult when we begin pitching resumes and applications at any job. After Mary focused her job search, she began getting called to interviews. After about a month, she had a new job.

August 29, 2015

Take the Time to Do It Right

 

Benjamin Franklin wrote:  “Take time for all things: great haste makes great waste.”

Too often job seekers are in a hurry to make things happen.  They want to write their resume in one day.  They want to receive a job offer after one interview.  They accept the first job that is offered to them.  Listen to Wise Old Ben.  Take the time to get things right.  This doesn’t mean taking forever, or using “getting it right” as an excuse for doing nothing.  Have a plan and a schedule.  In most cases, this means a few days, not weeks or months.  Review what you have done, and ask for opinions from people you trust.  It’s good to have a sense of urgency, but career management is all about making strategic decisions that will affect the rest of your life.  Take some time to make those decisions.

July 29, 2015

Taking Chances on Your Dream Job

 

I talked with two clients recently who were hired to dream jobs.  In both cases, the client hesitated before applying for the position.  Steve wanted a position in Europe.  However, his heart dropped when he saw the requirements:  MBA and second language.  Steve had a BA and only spoke English.  Then he read the position again and felt that no one could be more qualified based on his experience and achievements.  He took a chance and was rewarded with his dream job.  Mary works in human services as a counselor.  She’s performed managerial duties, but never held the title of manager.  We wrote her resume to emphasize her roles that required leadership and decision making.  Again, Mary didn’t think she’d get the job.  She applied, went through four interviews, and received an offer.  If you think you capable of doing a job, don’t be afraid to apply.  The trick to getting the job is to show how you are qualified.  You need to do this in your resume and during interviews.  Employers will look beyond their requirements if you show them why you’re the right person.  Don’t be afraid to the chance.  That’s the only way to find your dream job.

February 5, 2015

The Most Important Question in Getting a New Job

 

“What can you do for me?”

That’s what employers really want to know when they are hiring a new employee. Too often job seekers worry so much about what they’ve done – and haven’t done – in the past that they don’t answer the employer’s big question. In writing your resume and presenting yourself at an interview, stay focused on what the employer needs. How do you know what the employer needs? Look carefully at the job post, and adapt your resume to the requirements and qualifications. Before going on an interview, look at the job post again. Ask yourself: Why will I be an asset to the company? Show how your strengths will make you the best candidate. No employer will hire you just because of what you did in the past. They will hire you because of what you can do for them. Answer the question:

“What can you do for me?”

 

January 17, 2015

Making the General Specific

 

When I ask clients to name their strengths, they often point to broad qualities or skill sets, such as, leadership, communication skills, and flexibility. Too often that’s where they stop. The trick to good personal branding, networking, interviewing, and resume writing is to take this kind of strength and project it to the different audiences you interact with. For example, a senior sales professional and an office manager both need good communication skills, but they are different.  Sales representatives present, negotiate, and train to sell.  Office managers negotiate to buy products and train employees in job skills.  They might also lead meetings.  Whenever you are promoting yourself as a professional, think about the person or group you are addressing. What do they need to know about you? What is their biggest concern? Give them what they need to know, and they will give you the kind of respect that opens doors.

October 1, 2014

Waiting for the Job is a Bad Idea

 

One of my clients recently said people won’t need resumes soon. He had read “something on the Internet” that said employers would “find” 80-90% of employees on LinkedIn or through profiles on job boards. The problem with this kind of thinking is that it leads to a passive job search, waiting for a job to find you rather than looking actively to find a job.

I don’t buy the claim that there will come a time where most hiring will come through recruiting. There are two problems with this approach. First, recruiters would spend a lot of time having to weed through people who are in jobs and don’t want to move. Second, what would happen to salaries? If employees knew employers had to come to them, they could ask for more money. Under the current employers have the ball in their court. They can set the terms of employment, especially if the person they are interviewing is unemployed or anxious to leave his or her current job.

My biggest problems with stories like the one my client read is that they give the wrong idea about how to look for a job. Executives and professionals at the top of their fields should work with recruiters.  They are most likely to be found on LinkedIn.  For the rest of us, a good job search must be active. Following the great advice of Richard Nelson Bolles, I recommend using at least three ways to look for work. For most people, that means networking, responding to posted jobs, and pursuing jobs with companies that you most want to work for. LinkedIn is a great tool for doing all of these things. Think of it as a resource for an active job search. If someone finds your profile and calls you for an interview, that’s a bit of good luck. Don’t count on it. Stay active and manage your career. That’s the best way to find a new job.

July 14, 2014

What Computer Skills Do I Need?

 

My clients frequently worry that their computer skills are lacking. In most cases, they don’t need to worry. Here’s an easy test. If you’re seeking a job similar to your most recent jobs, you probably have the right kind of computer skills. You might not have used the same software, but you performed a similar function. As a second test, collect 10 job posts for the kind of positions you to want pursue. Check the computer and software skills that employers require. If they seek experience in a program you don’t know, research that software. In many cases, you have used something similar.

Think of computer skills as your tool box – what tools do you need to know to do your job? Once you have a good answer to that question, you can decide if you need to pursue training. Community colleges often offer reasonably priced computer classes. The Internet offers several online training services, some of which are free. If you need to brush up your skills find the option that works best for you. Don’t let a lack of computer skills be an excuse not to pursue your job search.

April 18, 2014

Transferable Skills and Career Change

 

Most clients who are considering career change start with two bad ideas. First, they assume they will have to go back to school. Second, they believe they will have to step down the career ladder back to entry level. Neither of these assumptions is necessarily true. If you can prove to a hiring manager that you can do the job, the experience and knowledge you have developed during your career will usually be enough to make a career change.

What would-be career changers too often ignore are transferable skills, which are skills that can be used on multiple jobs. Let me give you two examples from my recent projects.

Retail Manager to Human Resources: A client had extensive experience in retail management. Rather than talk about that industry, we focused on the skills he used that were related to HR: Onboarding, training, interviewing, and hiring. He completed certification in HR law and recruiting for diversity. This background, along with a good work history, enabled him to make the career transition he was seeking.

Event Management to Purchasing: Another client wants to move from an eight year career in planning and managing corporate events to purchasing. In her case, we focused on skills that included sourcing, negotiation, vendor relations, and logistics. In several cases, this client can give examples of how she reduced costs through her ability to negotiate price and terms. These skills will let her make the jump to a new career.

If you are considering changing careers, think about how you have developed and used transferable skills. It is very possible that you can pursue a career change right now. Show how you are able to do the new job, and be confident in your ability.

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