Career Calling

September 11, 2015

The Power of Walking Away

Filed under: Job Interviews — claycerny @ 9:01 pm
Tags: , , ,

 

Negotiating with a prospective employer is never easy.  Most people don’t even attempt to negotiate because they are afraid an offer will be pulled.  However, when job seekers chose to negotiate, they often get more than the initial offer.  This is especially true when they are willing to walk away from an offer.

A few months ago one of my clients received a job offer, but needed to have relocation costs paid.  We worked together to come up with a goal of $6,000.  At the last minute, my client changed her mind, and she told the employer that she would need $8,000 to relocate.  The manager handling her recruiting said they could not meet that request.  My client said she could not accept the offer.  She thought it was time to move on.  The next day, the company called back with a revised offer that included $6,000 in relocation fees and an ability to work remotely for one month, which let my client avoid paying two rents.  If my client had not stuck to her guns, she got most of what she wanted.  On the other hand, she did risk losing the job.

More recently, a client who is a manager with a small non-profit received a low ball offer from a large national corporation.  She told the recruiter that the offer would have to be significantly increased.   The next day the recruiter called with a $10,000 increase.  My client compared her current position to what the new employer would ask of her.  She also underscored the value she would bring to the employer.  She did not ask for a specific amount, but told the recruiter that the offer would need to be improved.  Two days went by.  My client thought she had pushed things too far.  She was wrong.  The next day the manager called and increased the offer by another $10,000.  She gambled and won.

I’m not recommending that every job seeker should take such drastic steps when negotiating.  However, if you feel that an offer is not fair, you might want to consider taking a chance in your negotiation.  There are no guarantees.  Some companies will decide not to hire you.  Others will recognize your value and give you what you’re asking.  Walking away is a big gamble that, in some cases, can have a bigger payoff.

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