Career Calling

December 15, 2014

Negotiating Salary or a Raise

 

Here’s another sign of a changing – improving – job market: The experts are talking about how negotiate a starting salary or a raise. Much of the advice is good. However, I think any kind of negotiation with an employer can be broken down to two basic questions:

 

  1. What do you want?

 

  1. Why should your employer give it to you?

 

Too often we as employees are resentful of co-workers who work less and make more money. Or we tell ourselves that we are working that we deserve better pay because we are working so hard. These points may be true, but they won’t help you get a raise or better starting salary. Focus on two people: the person who can give you a raise and yourself.

 

First, know what you want. Here it is important to know how other employees are paid and how similar companies pay people in similar positions. If you don’t have this information, you can do research using online salary websites. The problems with these sites is that they make broad estimates. Salaries vary from region to region and company to company.

 

Establish a clear goal for negotiation and a salary range. If your currently making $50,000 and want a $3,000 raise, give yourself and your boss room to work. I’d recommend asking for a raise between $2,500 and $4,000. This range will let you negotiate up or you might get what you want with any kind of dickering. If you ask for $3,000, expect your employer to offer less.

 

While you think about what you want, you also need to put yourself in the employer’s place: Why do you deserve a raise? Think about what you have done over the last year. How have you contributed to the company? How have you made a difference? Make a list of your achievements, quantifying them if possible. Know you worth and be ready to help you employer understand why you deserve better pay. Keep your tone professional at all times. Focus on what you are doing for the company and what you expect in return.

 

Some employers are still very hesitant to give raises. They might offer a much lower number than you want or say they can give no raise at all. Just a few years ago, your options would have been limited. Now, the good news is that the job market has changed and hiring is up. If your current employer won’t give you the salary you want, it’s time to look for a new job with better pay or better working conditions. Know your value and find an employer who is smart enough to pay a fair wage and value your skill.

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